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What are the most bizarre Japanese tradition?

Japan has many customs that to us seem strange, but if you think about it, they have deep meaning and they are for the Japanese force of law.

Europeans unaccustomed constant talk about Japanese food, and at mealtime they all talk only about how good the food is. It is considered very rude if a boy said while eating “Oishi” (delicious) at least two or three times.

The Japanese eat everything that swims in the sea, including dolphins. Dolphin meat tastes very different from fish, it is sometimes even eaten raw. You can cook the soup; a popular dish from Dolphin meat – “koseki”, something like a kebab.

Perhaps eating a lot of seafood is the reason that the woman with overweight is an extremely rare phenomenon.

Tipping in Japanese restaurants is considered an insult. Client hereby gives to understand that he is above the waiter. But if he paid exactly what is written in the score – they are equal.

In Japan, earthquakes happen often, it happens that the store or the apartment opened, no one. But to come in and take something that is considered a very big sin. Also – and not to give the police the money was found. Japanese police are incorruptible. Try to shove a bribe – the horror, the horror, the horror. But you can avoid punishment for a small violation, pretending Continue reading

Christmas traditions
Breakfast at the hotel. Sightseeing tour of Tokyo – a city of samurai's heroic history and the latest technology that changed the lives of people all over the planet. New…

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Customs and traditions of Japan
Hotels Flights Virtually unchanged since the middle ages preserved traditional Japanese costume, national interior, literary Japanese tea ceremony, theatre "Kabuki", "but" and "Bunraku" and many other equally peculiar traditions. And…

Continue reading →

Customs and traditions of Japan
Hotels Flights Virtually unchanged since the middle ages preserved traditional Japanese costume, national interior, literary Japanese tea ceremony, theatre "Kabuki", "but" and "Bunraku" and many other equally peculiar traditions. And…

Continue reading →